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  • 1
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) demonstrate an exception in the treatment of brain metastases (BM), because in patients with SCLC whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) only is the preferred treatment modality. The purpose of this study was to develop a prognostic score for patients with brain metastases from SCLC treated with WBRT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted utilizing a single-institution, previously described, retrospective database of patients with SCLC who were treated with WBRT (n = 221). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to generate the "brain metastases from SCLC score" (BMS score) based on favorable prognostic factors: Karnofsky performance status (KPS 〉 70), extracerebral disease status (stable disease/controlled), and time of appearance of BM (synchronous). Furthermore, the disease-specific graded prognostic assessment score as well as the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) were performed and compared with the new BMS score by using the log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test. RESULTS: BMS score and RPA showed the most significant differences between classes (P 〈 .001). BMS score revealed a mean overall survival (OS) of 2.62 months in group I (0-1 points), 6.61 months in group II (2-3 points), and 12.31 months in group III (4 points). The BMS score also identified the group with the shortest survival (2.62 months in group I), and the numbers of patients in each group were most equally distributed with the BMS score. CONCLUSION: The new BMS score was more prognostic than the RPA and disease-specific graded prognostic assessment scores. The BMS score is easy to use and reflects known prognostic factors in contemporary patients with SCLC treated with WBRT. Future studies are necessary to validate these findings.
    Type of Publication: Journal article epub ahead of print
    PubMed ID: 29373273
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  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: In 2007, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT00016211) demonstrated a beneficial effect on overall survival (OS) with the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for extensive disease (ED) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Nevertheless, debate is ongoing regarding the role of PCI, because the patients in that trial did not undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before treatment. Also, a recent Japanese randomized trial showed a detrimental effect of PCI on OS in patients with negative pretreatment brain MRI findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the medical records of 136 patients with ED SCLC who had initially responded to chemotherapy and undergone PCI from 2007 to 2015. The outcomes, radiation toxicity, neurologic progression-free survival, and OS after PCI were analyzed. Survival and correlations were calculated using log-rank and univariate Cox proportional hazard ratio analyses. RESULTS: The median OS and the median neurologic progression-free survival after PCI was 12 and 19 months, respectively. No significant survival difference was seen for patients who had undergone MRI before PCI compared with patients who had undergone contrast-enhanced computed tomography (P = .20). Univariate analysis for OS did not show a statistically significant effect for known cofactors. CONCLUSION: In the present cohort, PCI was associated with improved survival compared with the PCI arm of the EORTC trial, with a nearly doubled median OS period. Also, the median OS was prolonged by 2 months compared with the irradiation arm of the Japanese trial.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28027850
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; AGENTS ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; LUNG ; THERAPY ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; TIME ; PATIENT ; CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; SEQUENCES ; treatment ; STAGE ; TRIAL ; PROGRESSION ; EXPERIENCE ; chemotherapy ; MULTICENTER ; SOUTHWEST-ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; PHASE-II ; CARBOPLATIN ; SINGLE ; GEMCITABINE ; RE ; ELDERLY-PATIENTS ; QUALITY-OF-LIFE ; methods ; PHASE ; COMBINATION CHEMOTHERAPY ; docetaxel ; CANDIDATE ; clinical study ; LINE TREATMENT ; VINORELBINE PLUS CISPLATIN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy has been widely accepted as standard for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Gemcitabine and docetaxel are active as single agents. Our previous experience indicates that single-agent therapy, if given sequentially, could be an alternative to doublet combination chemotherapy and that sequence and schedule matter. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to receive first-line 3-weekly gemcitabine or docetaxel. At progression, patients received second-line therapy with the other agent. Treatment was considered feasible if 30% of the evaluable patients had ! 2 cycles of first-line and 2 cycles of second-line therapy and patient survival was ! 7 months from the start of treatment. For efficacy, time to progression, overall survival, response, and quality of life were analyzed. RESULTS: Three hundred thirty patients received gemcitabine followed by docetaxel or docetaxel followed by gemcitabine. Treatment was feasible for 60 patients (38%) with gemcitabine followed by docetaxel and for 80 patients (49%) with docetaxel followed by gemcitabine; treatment favored docetaxel followed by gemcitabine (P = 0.03539). Median survival for gemcitabine followed by docetaxel and docetaxel followed by gemcitabine was 6.3 months and 8.6 months, and 1-year survival rate was 28% and 31%, respectively. Objective response rates were 〈= 10% for both treatment strategies. Quality of life was significantly better in gemcitabine followed by docetaxel (P = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Single-agent gemcitabine and docetaxel are feasible as defined for both sequences but treatment favors docetaxel followed by gemcitabine. Thus, it is reasonable to state that single-agent therapy given sequentially might be a candidate for palliation and therefore should be investigated in comparison with combination therapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17311688
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