Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: brain ; Germany ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; DIAGNOSIS ; DISEASE ; PROTEIN ; PATIENT ; MECHANISM ; BIOMARKERS ; mechanisms ; ACID ; STAGE ; MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT ; VASCULAR DEMENTIA ; GLUTAMATE ; Alzheimer's disease ; biomarker ; FLUID ; TRANSMITTERS ; amino acids ; PROTEIN-LEVELS ; NEVER ; Cerebrospinal fluid ; CSF ; PHOSPHORYLATED TAU ; SENILE DEMENTIA ; TOTAL TAU
    Abstract: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers play an important role in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its postulated precursor stage mild cognitive impairment (MCI). While CSF tau protein, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid have become part of the diagnostic process in clinical routine, the importance of several other biomarkers remains quite unclear. Among these, amino acids and metabolic compounds have been studied in clinical conditions mostly other than AD and, to our knowledge, never in MCI. In patients with AD (n = 14) and MCI (n = 13) we now determined CSF levels of 36 different amino acids and metabolic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography. We found that 8 out of 36 amino acids (urea, threonine, glutamate, citrulline, beta-aminobutyric acid, ornithine, ammonia and arginine) were significantly elevated in the CSF of patients with AD compared to those with MCI. As most of these amino acids and metabolic compounds are functionally important for brain-specific metabolic processes, neurotransmitter pathways or compensatory mechanisms, our findings might reflect these changes occurring within the brain of patients with MCI and those who developed manifest AD. Copyright (C) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20551690
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Large epidemiological prospective studies represent an important opportunity for investigating risk factors for rare diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we describe the procedures we used for ascertaining PD cases in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study. METHODS: The following three-phase procedure was used: (1) elaboration of a NeuroEPIC4PD template for clinical data collection, (2) identification of all potential PD cases via record linkage and (3) validation of the diagnosis through clinical record revision, in a population of 220,494 subjects recruited in 7 European countries. All cases were labelled with the NeuroEPIC4PD diagnoses of 'definite', 'very likely', 'probable', or 'possible' PD. RESULTS: A total of 881 PD cases were identified, with over 2,741,780 person-years of follow-up (199 definite, 275 very likely, 146 probable, and 261 possible). Of these, 734 were incident cases. The mean age at diagnosis was 67.9 years (SD 9.2) and 458 patients (52.0%) were men. Bradykinesia was the most frequent presenting motor sign (76.5%). Tremor-dominant and akinetic rigid forms of PD were the most common types of PD. A total of 289 patients (32.8%) were dead at the time of the last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This exercise proved that it is feasible to ascertain PD in large population-based cohort studies and offers a potential framework to be replicated in similar studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26375921
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate a role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and peroxidase in ellipticine oxidative activation in two mouse strains differing in expression of NADPH:CYP reductase (POR) [the HRN (Hepatic Cytochrome P450 Reductase Null) mice, in which POR is deleted in hepatocytes and its wild-type (WT) counterpart], and in levels of CYP1A1/2 and cytochrome b5 that were modulated by treatment of these mouse models with a CYP1A inducer, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). METHODS: Ellipticine-DNA adducts were detected by 32P-postlabeling. HPLC was employed for the separation and characterization of ellipticine metabolites. RESULTS: Hepatic microsomes of HRN and WT mice activate ellipticine to form ellipticine-derived DNA adducts. A 2.2- and 10.4-fold increase in amounts of ellipticine-derived DNA adducts formed by liver microsomes was caused by exposure of HRN and WT mice to BaP, respectively. The results found and utilization of NADPH and arachidonic acid, cofactors of CYP- and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent enzyme systems, respectively, as well as inhibitors of CYP1A1/2 and 3A, demonstrate that the CYP1A and 3A enzymes play a major role in ellipticine activation in liver microsomes. In addition, the COX enzyme is important in ellipticine activation in liver of HRN mice. CONCLUSION: The CYP1A and 3A enzymes activate ellipticine mainly in liver of WT mice, whereas peroxidase COX plays this role in liver of HRN mice. Treatment of mice with BaP increases an impact of CYP1A on ellipticine activation. A pattern of expression levels of these enzymes plays a crucial role in their impact on this process.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24362092
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...