Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: measurement ; CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; MALES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; SWEDEN ; REGION ; REGIONS ; NETHERLANDS ; ALCOHOL ; GREECE ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; antioxidants ; DENMARK ; BETA-CAROTENE ; VITAMIN-E ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; alpha-carotene ; beta-cryptoxanthin ; carotenoids ; lutein ; LYCOPENE ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY ; RETINOL ; SEASONAL-VARIATION ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; zeaxanthin
    Abstract: Background: In addition to their possible direct biological effects, plasma carotenoids can be used as biochemical markers of fruit and vegetable consumption for identifying diet-disease associations in epidemiological studies. Few studies have compared levels of these carotenoids between countries in Europe. Objective: Our aim was to assess the variability of plasma carotenoid levels within the cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Plasma levels of six carotenoids-alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin-were measured cross-sectionally in 3043 study subjects from 16 regions in nine European countries. We investigated the relative influence of gender, season, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol intake and smoking status on plasma levels of the carotenoids. Results: Mean plasma level of the sum of the six carotenoids varied twofold between regions (1.35 mumol l(-1) for men in Malmo, Sweden vs. 2.79 mumol l(-1) for men in Ragusa/Naples, Italy; 1.61 mumol l(-1) for women in The Netherlands vs. 3.52 mumol l(-1) in Ragusa/Naples, Italy). Mean levels of individual carotenoids varied up to fourfold (alpha-carotene: 0.06 mumol l(-1) for men in Murcia, Spain vs. 0.25 mumol l(-1) for vegetarian men living in the UK). In multivariate regression analyses, region was the most important predictor of total plasma carotenoid level (partial R-2=27.3%), followed by BMI (partial R-2=5.2%), gender (partial R-2=2.7%) and smoking status (partial R-2=2.8%). Females had higher total carotenoid levels than males across Europe. Conclusions: Plasma levels of carotenoids vary substantially between 16 different regions in Italy, Greece, Spain, France, Germany, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands. Compared with region of residence, the other demographic and lifestyle factors and laboratory measurements have limited predictive value for plasma carotenoid levels in Europe
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15369608
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; POPULATION ; METABOLISM ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; ALPHA ; PLASMA ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; PREVALENCE ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; antioxidants ; NUTRIENTS ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; SERUM ; ADULTS ; HAY-FEVER ; REGRESSION ; RE ; allergic sensitisation ; CHILDHOOD ASTHMA ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; fruits and vegetables ; PARTICIPANTS ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; allergic rhinitis ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; odds ratio ; GAMMA-TOCOPHEROL ; ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS
    Abstract: Objectives: Antioxidant nutrients like carotenoids, tocopherols and vitamin C have been suggested to protect against allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitisation but scientific evidence is scarce. The aims of the study were to measure the plasma concentration of six carotenoids, alpha- and gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C as biomarkers of the intake, absorption and subsequent metabolism of these nutrients, and to assess their association with allergic rhinitis and sensitisation. Method: Data from a cross-sectional study on representative dietary and lifestyle habits of the population of Bavaria, Germany, were analysed. The plasma levels of six carotenoids (alpha-carotene, P-carotene, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and cryptoxanthin) as well as of alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C were measured in 547 adults aged between 19 and 81 years. Participants with specific serum immunoglobulin E 〉= 700 U l(-1) were categorised as sensitised. The association of plasma antioxidant levels, allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitisation was assessed by means of unconditional logistic regression models. Results: We observed a negative association between plasma total carotenoids and the prevalence of allergic rhinitis, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.13 (0.54-2.39) for the second, 0.72 (0-33-1-58) for the third and 0.44 (0.19-1.03) for the fourth quartile of total carotenoids concentration (P for trend = 0.0332); results for lycopene failed to reach statistical significance (P = 0.0608). Other single carotenoids, tocopherols and vitamin C were unrelated to allergic rhinitis. Allergic sensitisation was negatively associated with plasma gamma-tocopherol, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.92 (0.51-1.65) for the second, 1.00 (0-56-1.80) for the third and 0.45 (0.23-0.88) for the fourth quartile of plasma gamma-tocopherol concentration (P for trend = 0.0410). No other antioxidant was significantly related to allergic sensitisation. Conclusions: High plasma carotenoid concentrations reflecting a diet high in various fruits and vegetables might have a protective effect on allergic rhinitis in adulthood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870019
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; DISTINCT ; MECHANISM ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; mechanisms ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; Jun ; cholesterol ; DIET ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; NUTRIENTS ; FRAMEWORK ; RE ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; PRESERVATION ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; NORTHERN ; processed meat ; 24-hour dietary recall ; ANIMAL PRODUCTS ; CHOLESTEROL OXIDATION ; cooking methods ; DONE RED MEAT
    Abstract: Objective: There is increasing evidence for a significant effect of processed meat (PM) intake on cancer risk. However, refined knowledge on how components of this heterogeneous food group are associated with cancer risk is still missing. Here, actual data on the intake of PM subcategories is given; within a food-based approach we considered preservation methods, cooking methods and nutrient content for stratification, in order to address most of the aetiologically relevant hypotheses. Design and setting: Standardised computerised 24-hour diet recall interviews were collected within the framework of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study in 27 centres across 10 European countries. Subjects: Subjects were 22 924 women and 13 031 men aged 35 - 74 years. Results: Except for the so-called 'health-conscious' cohort in the UK, energy-adjusted total PM intake ranged between 11.1 and 47.9 g day(-1) in women and 18.8 and 88.5 g day(-1) in men. Ham, salami-type sausages and heated sausages contributed most to the overall PM intake. The intake of cured (addition of nitrate/nitrite) PM was highest in the German, Dutch and northern European EPIC centres, with up to 68.8 g day(-1) in men. The same was true for smoked PM (up to 51.8 g day(-1)). However, due to the different manufacturing practice, the highest average intake of NaNO2 through PM consumption was found for the Spanish centres (5.4 mg day(-1) in men) as compared with German and British centres. Spanish centres also showed the highest intake of NaCl-rich types of PM; most cholesterol- and iron-rich PM was consumed in central and northern European centres. Possibly hazardous cooking methods were more often used for PM preparation in central and northern European centres. Conclusions: We applied a food-based categorisation of PM that addresses aetiologically relevant mechanisms for cancer development and found distinct differences in dietary intake of these categories of PM across European cohorts. This predisposes EPIC to further investigate the role of PM in cancer aetiology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870017
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: MORTALITY ; PATTERNS ; WOMEN ; MARKERS ; PROJECT ; CALIBRATION ; Mediterranean diet ; ADHERENCE
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Health-beneficial effects of adhering to a healthy Nordic diet index have been suggested. However, it has not been examined to what extent the included dietary components are exclusively related to the Nordic countries or if they are part of other European diets as well, suggesting a broader preventive potential. The present study describes the intake of seven a priori defined healthy food items (apples/pears, berries, cabbages, dark bread, shellfish, fish and root vegetables) across ten countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and examines their consumption across Europe. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. A 24 h dietary recall was administered through a software program containing country-specific recipes. Sex-specific mean food intake was calculated for each centre/country, as well as percentage of overall food groups consumed as healthy Nordic food items. All analyses were weighted by day and season of data collection. SETTING: Multi-centre, European study. SUBJECTS: Persons (n 36 970) aged 35-74 years, constituting a random sample of 519 978 EPIC participants. RESULTS: The highest intakes of the included diet components were: cabbages and berries in Central Europe; apples/pears in Southern Europe; dark bread in Norway, Denmark and Greece; fish in Southern and Northern countries; shellfish in Spain; and root vegetables in Northern and Central Europe. Large inter-centre variation, however, existed in some countries. CONCLUSIONS: Dark bread, root vegetables and fish are strongly related to a Nordic dietary tradition. Apples/pears, berries, cabbages, fish, shellfish and root vegetables are broadly consumed in Europe, and may thus be included in regional public health campaigns.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24589249
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Pattern analysis has emerged as a tool to depict the role of multiple nutrients/foods in relation to health outcomes. The present study aimed at extracting nutrient patterns with respect to breast cancer (BC) aetiology. DESIGN: Nutrient patterns were derived with treelet transform (TT) and related to BC risk. TT was applied to twenty-three log-transformed nutrient densities from dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals computed using Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between quintiles of nutrient pattern scores and risk of overall BC, and by hormonal receptor and menopausal status. Principal component analysis was applied for comparison. SETTING: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). SUBJECTS: Women (n 334 850) from the EPIC study. RESULTS: The first TT component (TC1) highlighted a pattern rich in nutrients found in animal foods loading on cholesterol, protein, retinol, vitamins B12 and D, while the second TT component (TC2) reflected a diet rich in beta-carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins C and B6, fibre, Fe, Ca, K, Mg, P and folate. While TC1 was not associated with BC risk, TC2 was inversely associated with BC risk overall (HRQ5 v. Q1=0.89, 95 % CI 0.83, 0.95, P trend〈0.01) and showed a significantly lower risk in oestrogen receptor-positive (HRQ5 v. Q1=0.89, 95 % CI 0.81, 0.98, P trend=0.02) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours (HRQ5 v. Q1=0.87, 95 % CI 0.77, 0.98, P trend〈0.01). CONCLUSIONS: TT produces readily interpretable sparse components explaining similar amounts of variation as principal component analysis. Our results suggest that participants with a nutrient pattern high in micronutrients found in vegetables, fruits and cereals had a lower risk of BC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25702596
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Pattern analysis has emerged as a tool to depict the role of multiple nutrients/foods in relation to health outcomes. The present study aimed at extracting nutrient patterns with respect to breast cancer (BC) aetiology. DESIGN: Nutrient patterns were derived with treelet transform (TT) and related to BC risk. TT was applied to twenty-three log-transformed nutrient densities from dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals computed using Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between quintiles of nutrient pattern scores and risk of overall BC, and by hormonal receptor and menopausal status. Principal component analysis was applied for comparison. SETTING: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). SUBJECTS: Women (n 334 850) from the EPIC study. RESULTS: The first TT component (TC1) highlighted a pattern rich in nutrients found in animal foods loading on cholesterol, protein, retinol, vitamins B12 and D, while the second TT component (TC2) reflected a diet rich in beta-carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins C and B6, fibre, Fe, Ca, K, Mg, P and folate. While TC1 was not associated with BC risk, TC2 was inversely associated with BC risk overall (HRQ5 v. Q1=0.89, 95 % CI 0.83, 0.95, P trend〈0.01) and showed a significantly lower risk in oestrogen receptor-positive (HRQ5 v. Q1=0.89, 95 % CI 0.81, 0.98, P trend=0.02) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours (HRQ5 v. Q1=0.87, 95 % CI 0.77, 0.98, P trend〈0.01). CONCLUSIONS: TT produces readily interpretable sparse components explaining similar amounts of variation as principal component analysis. Our results suggest that participants with a nutrient pattern high in micronutrients found in vegetables, fruits and cereals had a lower risk of BC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25702596
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
  • 8
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To characterize meal patterns across ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study utilizing dietary data collected through a standardized 24 h diet recall during 1995-2000. Eleven predefined intake occasions across a 24 h period were assessed during the interview. In the present descriptive report, meal patterns were analysed in terms of daily number of intake occasions, the proportion reporting each intake occasion and the energy contributions from each intake occasion. SETTING: Twenty-seven centres across ten European countries. SUBJECTS: Women (64 %) and men (36 %) aged 35-74 years (n 36 020). RESULTS: Pronounced differences in meal patterns emerged both across centres within the same country and across different countries, with a trend for fewer intake occasions per day in Mediterranean countries compared with central and northern Europe. Differences were also found for daily energy intake provided by lunch, with 38-43 % for women and 41-45 % for men within Mediterranean countries compared with 16-27 % for women and 20-26 % for men in central and northern European countries. Likewise, a south-north gradient was found for daily energy intake from snacks, with 13-20 % (women) and 10-17 % (men) in Mediterranean countries compared with 24-34 % (women) and 23-35 % (men) in central/northern Europe. CONCLUSIONS: We found distinct differences in meal patterns with marked diversity for intake frequency and lunch and snack consumption between Mediterranean and central/northern European countries. Monitoring of meal patterns across various cultures and populations could provide critical context to the research efforts to characterize relationships between dietary intake and health.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27194183
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To characterize meal patterns across ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) calibration study. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study utilizing dietary data collected through a standardized 24 h diet recall during 1995-2000. Eleven predefined intake occasions across a 24 h period were assessed during the interview. In the present descriptive report, meal patterns were analysed in terms of daily number of intake occasions, the proportion reporting each intake occasion and the energy contributions from each intake occasion. SETTING: Twenty-seven centres across ten European countries. SUBJECTS: Women (64 %) and men (36 %) aged 35-74 years (n 36 020). RESULTS: Pronounced differences in meal patterns emerged both across centres within the same country and across different countries, with a trend for fewer intake occasions per day in Mediterranean countries compared with central and northern Europe. Differences were also found for daily energy intake provided by lunch, with 38-43 % for women and 41-45 % for men within Mediterranean countries compared with 16-27 % for women and 20-26 % for men in central and northern European countries. Likewise, a south-north gradient was found for daily energy intake from snacks, with 13-20 % (women) and 10-17 % (men) in Mediterranean countries compared with 24-34 % (women) and 23-35 % (men) in central/northern Europe. CONCLUSIONS: We found distinct differences in meal patterns with marked diversity for intake frequency and lunch and snack consumption between Mediterranean and central/northern European countries. Monitoring of meal patterns across various cultures and populations could provide critical context to the research efforts to characterize relationships between dietary intake and health.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27194183
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; Germany ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; HEART ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; risk factors ; Jun ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; DIETARY ; NETHERLANDS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; LIFE-STYLE ; HEART-DISEASE ; Mediterranean diet ; REGRESSION ; PATTERN ; INCREASE ; overall survival ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; INTERVAL ; analysis ; dietary patterns ; elderly ; PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ; QUALITY INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; VARIABLES ; ENGLAND ; multi-centre cohort study ; BRITISH ADULTS ; coronary heart disease ; FOOD-INTAKE PATTERNS
    Abstract: Objective: To investigate the association of a posteriori dietary patterns with overall survival of older Europeans. Design and setting: This is a multi-centre cohort study. Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the association of the prevailing, a posteriori-derived, plant-based dietary pattern with all-cause mortality in a population of subjects who were 60 years or older at recruitment to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Elderly cohort). Analyses controlled for all known potential risk factors. Subjects: in total, 74 607 men and women, 60 years or older at enrolment and without previous coronary heart disease, stroke or cancer, with complete information about dietary intakes and potentially confounding variables, and with known survival status as of December 2003, were included in the analysis. Results: An increase in the score which measures the adherence to the plant-based diet was associated with a lower overall mortality, a one standard deviation increment corresponding to a statistically significant reduction of 14% (95% confidence interval 5-23%). In country-specific analyses the apparent association was stronger in Greece, Spain, Denmark and The Netherlands, and absent in the UK and Germany. Conclusions: Greater adherence to the plant-based diet that was defined a posteriori in this population of European elders is associated with lower all-cause mortality. This dietary score is moderately positively correlated with the Modified Mediterranean Diet Score that has been constructed a priori and was also shown to be beneficial for the Survival of the same EPIC-Elderly cohort
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17381929
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...