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    Keywords: BLOOD ; Germany ; LUNG ; QUANTIFICATION ; TIME ; BLOOD-FLOW ; blood flow ; FLOW ; MRI ; PATTERNS ; PARAMETERS ; HYPERTENSION ; BLOOD-FLOW MEASUREMENTS ; BREATH-HOLD ; ENCODED CINE MRI ; HEMODYNAMICS ; RE ; HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS ; phase-contrast MRI ; pulmonary circulation ; systemic circulation ; VENTRICULAR STROKE VOLUME
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to use phase-contrast MRI to evaluate the influence of various breathing maneuvers on the hemodynamics of the pulmonary and systemic arterial circulation. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Twenty-five volunteers were examined with phase-contrast MRI. Flow measurements were acquired in the aorta, pulmonary trunk, and left and right pulmonary arteries during deep, large-volume inspiratory breath-hold, expiratory breath-hold, and smooth respiration (no breath-hold). Parameters assessed were peak velocity, blood flow, velocity gradient, and acceleration time. RESULTS. Pulmonary blood flow and peak velocity were significantly reduced during inspiratory breath-hold and expiratory breath-hold compared with no breath-hold (p 〈 0.01). Pulmonary velocity gradient in inspiratory breath-hold was significantly (p:! 0.01) lower than in expiratory breath-hold and no breath-hold. There was no difference in velocity gradient between expiratory breath-hold and no breath-hold. Peak velocity in the aorta was lowest with no breath-hold. Velocity gradient was highest in expiratory breath-hold, and no breath-hold had the smallest SD. Acceleration time in the pulmonary trunk showed no difference between inspiratory breath-hold, expiratory breath-hold, and no breath-hold. Blood flow distribution to the left (45-47%) and to the right (53-55%) lung was not influenced by breathing maneuver. CONCLUSION. Measurements during smooth respiration showed the smallest SD. Therefore, no-breath-hold measurements should be considered for assessment of hemodynamics in clinical practice
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16861549
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