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    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; INDEX ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; hormone ; PLASMA ; NUMBER ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; cancer risk ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; cholesterol ; LIPOPROTEIN ; LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN ; case-control studies ; ABNORMALITIES ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; CLUSTER ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; BODIES ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; RE ; INCREASE ; BODY-SIZE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; metabolic syndrome ; HORMONES ; prospective ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; SET ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX ; lipid ; HDL-CHOLESTEROL ; LOW-DENSITY ; SERUM-CHOLESTEROL
    Abstract: To clarify the role of metabolic factors in endometrial carcinogenesis, we conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), and examined the relation between prediagnostic plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and glucose, the metabolic syndrome (MetS; a cluster of metabolic factors) and endometrial cancer risk. Among pre- and postmenopausal women, 284 women developed endometrial cancer during follow-up. Using risk set sampling, 546 matched control subjects were selected. From conditional logistic regression models, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were inversely associated with risk body mass index (BMI)-adjusted relative risk (FR) for top versus bottom quartile 0.61 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.38-0.97), P-trend= 0.02). Glucose levels were positively associated with risk (BMI-adjusted RR top versus bottom quartile 1.69 (95% Cl 0.99-2.90), P-trend, = 0.03), which appeared stronger among postmenopausal women (BMI-adjusted RR top versus bottom tertile 2.61 (95% Cl 1.46-4.66), P-trend=0.0006, P-heterogeneity=0.13) and never-users of exogenous hormones (P-heterogeneity=0-005 for oral contraceptive (OC) use and 0.05 for hormone replacement therapy-use). The associations of HDL-C and glucose with risk were no longer statistically significant after further adjustment for obesity-related hormones. Plasma total cholesterol, Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides were not significantly related to overall risk. The presence of MetS was associated with risk (RR 2.12 (95% CI 1.51-2.97)), which increased with the number of MetS factors (P-trend=0.02). An increasing number of MetS factors other than waist circumference, however, was marginally significantly associated with risk only in women with waist circumference above the median (P-interaction=0-01). None of the associations differed significantly by fasting status. These findings suggest that metabolic abnormalities and obesity may act synergistically to increase endometrial cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17914105
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